• Robby Zampino

Ultra96v2: Booting a Baremetal Hello World on the A53 From The CLI


This post describes how to boot a "Hello World" application on the Ultra96v2 board over JTAG. The Xilinx Software Commandline Tool (XSCT) is used to allow this entire process to be done from the command line.


Notes

A few variables will be used throughout the tutorial. Make sure to replace these with your own unique values.

  • <project_name>: A name for your Vivado project

  • <project_folder>: A folder you want to store your project in

  • <xilinx_tools>: The folder you installed your Xilinx tools into

Windows Default: C:/Xilinx

Linux Default: /tools/xilinx


Another thing to be careful about is using spaces in your <project_name> and <project_folder>. This can sometimes break Vivado and SDK.


If you are working through this tutorial on Windows, you want to make sure to use / as you directory seperater instead of \. I've found the Xilinx tools to be picky about this.


Prereqs


Tutorials

This tutorial is a continuation of our "Ultra96v2: Building A Hardware Platform from the CLI" tutorial.


Hardware

To run through this and subsequent tutorials, you will need some hardware.


Software

To run through this and subsequent tutorials, you will need some software.

  • A Xilinx Vivado 2019.1 install

  • A Xilinx SDK 2019.1 install


Tutorial


Adding the Ultra96v2 to SDK

A board definition file (BDF) is required for SDK target projects at the Ultra96v2. The BDF for the Ultra96v2 is available from Avnet via their github.


If you completed the previous tutorial for Vivado you can reuse the folder you downloaded.


To add the BDF to SDK:

Add the BDF to SDK

  • The BDF for the Ultra96v2 is located in the Ultra96v2 subfolder of the repo

  • Copy this folder to the board_files directory of you Xilinx SDK install.

  • This is located in <xilinx_tools>/SDK/2019.1/data/boards/board_files.


Launch Hardware Server


Once we finish setting up our project we will want to run it on a device. We will need to launch Xilinx Hardware Server to do this. Let's do this now.


To launch hardware server run the following from a shell prompt:

<xilinx_tools>/SDK/2019.1/bin/hw_server

Launching XSCT (Xilinx Software Comandline Tool)

We will now launch XSCT. XSCT allows us to run and control SDK without the GUI.


Windows

To launch XSCT on Windows we will run the batch script. This can either be opened from the file explorer or run from a command prompt.

<xilinx_tools>/SDK/2019.1/bin/xsct.bat

Linux

To launch XSCT on Linux we will run the xsct binary.

<xilinx_tools>/SDK/2019.1/bin/xsct

For the rest of the tutorial, unless specified, all of the commands will be run in xsct


Importing The Hardware Platform


After completing the previous tutorial, you should have a <project_folder>/<project_name>.sdk folder.


This folder contains Vivado's exported hardware platform.


Now we will import this into SDK.


First we need to change SDK into our projects workspace.

cd <project_folder>/<project_name>.sdk/
setws .

Now we will create a hardware platform from the exported .hdf file.

createhw -name hw_platform_0 -hwspec design_1_wrapper.hdf

Note that the file name design_1_wrapper.hdf corresponds to the name we assigned the block design in the last tutorial. If you have a differently named block design your .hdf will be named differently.


Creating a Board Support Package (BSP)


We will now create a BSP for our device. This will allow us to create applications targeting the A53 processing system of the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC.

createbsp -name standalone_bsp_0 -proc psu_cortexa53_0 -hwproject hw_platform_0

The default BSP has the uart output configured for psu_uart_0 instead of psu_uart_1. In order to see output, we have to change this setting.

configbsp -bsp standalone_bsp_0 stdin "psu_uart_1"
configbsp -bsp standalone_bsp_0 stdout "psu_uart_1"

To save these changed, we have to update the bsp's mss file.

updatemss -mss standalone_bsp_0/system.mss

Creating an Application Project


Now that our BSP in created, we can use it to target a example application at the A53. We will now create a example "Hello World" application.

createapp -name Hello_Ultra96 -app "Hello World" -bsp standalone_bsp_0 -hwproject hw_platform_0 -lang "c" -proc psu_cortexa53_0

The lang parameter selects the target language for the example project. Valid options for this are c and c++.


Fixing Broken UART


When targetting Ultra96v2 board, xsct sets a incorrect parameter in the xparameters.h header file which prevents the UART from working correct.


To fix this, we need to change a couple of values.


In <project_folder>/<project_name>.sdk/standalone_bsp_0/psu_cortexa53_0/include/xparameters.h, change the lines

#define STDIN_BASEADDRESS 0xFF000000
#define STDOUT_BASEADDRESS 0xFF000000

to

#define STDIN_BASEADDRESS 0xFF010000
#define STDOUT_BASEADDRESS 0xFF010000

Build all Projects


Before programming the Ultra96v2, we will need to build everything we have created.

To run a build:

projects -build

Connect to Hardware Server


Now we need to connect to the hardware server instance that we launched earlier.

connect

To connect to a hardware server instance on another machine, use


connect -host <host name/ip> -port <port num>


Reset the System


Now we will reset the Ultra96v2 board to a clean slate.

# load the Zynq US+ utilities into the working environment
source <xilinx_tools>/SDK/2019.1/scripts/sdk/util/zynqmp_utils.tcl

# set our jtag device to point to the APU
targets -set -nocase -filter {name =~"APU*" && jtag_cable_name =~ "Avnet USB-to-JTAG/UART Pod V1 1234-oj1A"} -index 1
# reset the system
rst -system
# wait 3 seconds before proceeding
after 3000

Programming the FPGA


The first step to programming the deivce is to program the FPGA. This will program the bistream that Vivado included with the .hdf file when we exported it.

# set our jtag device to point to the FPGA
targets -set -filter {jtag_cable_name =~ "Avnet USB-to-JTAG/UART Pod V1 1234-oj1A" && level==0} -index 0
# program the fpga
fpga "<project_folder>/<project_name>.sdk/hw_platform_0/design_1_wrapper.bit"

The file name design_1_wrapper.bit corresponds to the name we assigned the block design in the last tutorial. If you have a differently named block design your .hdf will be named differently.


Connecting to The Serial Terminal


Before we program the "Hello World" program on the A53, we want to open our serial terminal.

Connect your serial terminal to the Ultra96v2 UART. Settings: Baud rate: 115200


Programming the A53


Now we will program the A53.

# set our jtag target to be the APU
targets -set -nocase -filter {name =~"APU*" && jtag_cable_name =~ "Avnet USB-to-JTAG/UART Pod V1 1234-oj1A"} -index 1

# load the Vivado hardware design and set the memory map for the APU jtag target
loadhw -hw hw_platform_0_script/system.hdf -mem-ranges [list {0x80000000 0xbfffffff} {0x400000000 0x5ffffffff} {0x1000000000 0x7fffffffff}]

# disable memory access protection for dow, mrd and mwr commands
configparams force-mem-access 1

# set our jtag target to point to the APU
targets -set -nocase -filter {name =~"APU*" && jtag_cable_name =~ "Avnet USB-to-JTAG/UART Pod V1 1234-oj1A"} -index 1

# load the psu_init tcl into our working environment
source hw_platform_0_script/psu_init.tcl

# initalize the A53 CPU
psu_init
# wait for 1 sec
after 1000
# Send a PL power up request to the PMU
psu_ps_pl_isolation_removal
# wait for 1 sec
after 1000
psu_ps_pl_reset_config
catch {psu_protection}

# set our jtag target to core 0 of the A53 processor
targets -set -nocase -filter {name =~"*A53*0" && jtag_cable_name =~ "Avnet USB-to-JTAG/UART Pod V1 1234-oj1A"} -index 1
# reset the processor
rst -processor
# download our compiled "Hello World" application
dow Hello_Ultra96_script/Debug/Hello_Ultra96.elf
# turn memory access protection back on
configparams force-mem-access 0

# set our jtag target to core 0 of the A53 processor
targets -set -nocase -filter {name =~"*A53*0" && jtag_cable_name =~ "Avnet USB-to-JTAG/UART Pod V1 1234-oj1A"} -index 1
# run the Hello World application
con

Result


You should see the text "Hello World" outputted on you serial terminal.

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